Hall of Fame: 2011

Dick Flavin

His television commentaries have appeared on NBC TV, CNN and on WBZ TV in Boston. He is the winner of seven Emmy Awards for television writing and commentary and was the narrator of The Teammates, an ESPN documentary that was nominated for three 2004 Emmy Awards.

Emmy-award winning news reporter Dick Flavin is also a humorist, a riveting personality, a commentator on all things newsworthy and domestic as well as a playwright and the Poet Laureate of the Boston Red Sox. Flavin is also one of America's leading speakers and writers. He has made thousands of appearances all across America and recently appeared at Symphony Hall reciting Teddy at the Bat, his tribute to Ted Williams. His television commentaries have appeared on NBC TV, CNN and on WBZ TV in Boston. He is the winner of seven Emmy Awards for television writing and commentary and was the narrator of The Teammates, an ESPN documentary that was nominated for three 2004 Emmy Awards.

In a 1988 profile of Flavin, The Boston Globe noted: “Dick Flavin, who has been, let's see, a real estate salesman, an employee of the Democratic State Committee, aide to Senate President Maurice Donahue, press secretary to Mayor Kevin White, head of his own public relations firm, political reporter at Channel 7, political satirist at Channel 4, and so successful at public speaking for 15 months that he is selling his home in Wayland and moving to Washington to compete in the big leagues of public speaking. "There's a perception," he says, "that if you come from Washington, you know what you're talking about."

“A satirist at WBZ-TV for 14 years, appearing as often as five nights a week for a salary of six figures, Flavin quit last year to take up public speaking. "I'm embarrassed to tell you what it pays," he said. "Thirtyfive hundred dollars an appearance." He speaks 75 times this year, sometimes for charity, and will earn $150,000, more than he was paid in television . . .

“In 15 months, Flavin has spoken in 30 states to organizations as obscure as the Dry Cleaners Association. Next week, he speaks in Naples, Fla., and Houston, and tomorrow flies to Traverse City, Mich., to address pipeline workers. ‘I'm having fun,’ he says. ‘If I go down the drain, it's my fault. I can't blame a runny-nose kid they brought in as news director. Also, gratification is immediate. In television, you speak to a million people, but you're still talking to a piece of glass.’”


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