Hall of Fame: 2011

Sherm Feller

He had a long and distinguished career as a pioneering talk show host, disc jockey, was friends with many celebrities, and wrote or co-wrote a number of hit songs. Sherm Feller’s voice was known to every Red Sox fan: from 1967 through 1993, he was the public address announcer at Fenway Park, famous for his iconic greeting, “Ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls, welcome to Fenway Park.”

Sherm Feller’s voice was known to every Red Sox fan: from 1967 through 1993, he was the public address announcer at Fenway Park, famous for his iconic greeting, “Ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls, welcome to Fenway Park.” But Feller was much more than a public address announcer. He had a long and distinguished career as a pioneering talk show host, disc jockey, was friends with many celebrities, and wrote or co-wrote a number of hit songs.

Feller was born in Brockton and raised in Roxbury. A graduate of Roxbury Memorial High School, he attended Suffolk University, where he studied law, but left before graduating because he wanted to work in radio. His career began in Manchester NH at WMUR, and by late 1941, he had come to work at WLLH in Lowell, where he not only hosted a popular show but performed with the woman who would become his wife, Judy Valentine. Feller’s career took him to Boston’s WEEI in 1948, where he was credited with hosting one of the city’s first call-in talk shows, “Club Midnight.” He later worked at WLAW in Lawrence, and WVDA in Boston. He became friends with such stars as Frank Sinatra and Nat “King” Cole, and among the big names who recorded the songs Feller wrote were the Mills Brothers, Fred Waring,and Vaughn Monroe; Arthur Fiedler and the Boston Pops also performed Feller’s music. Feller was also known for the top-40 hit he co-wrote in 1958, “Summertime Summertime,” by the Jamies.

In 1967, Feller was hired to be the Public Address announcer at Fenway Park, where he became an iconic and beloved figure during a 26-year career. He also continued to do some radio work, with a big-band program on WROL. He died suddenly from heart disease in January 1994, at the age of 75.


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